Press Kit

Name Pronunciation

Name Conventions

My name breaks down like so:

S.First initial
QiouyiMiddle name
LuFamily name

You may refer to me as S., Sophie, Qiouyi, or Lu. “S. Qiouyi” and “Qiouyi Lu” are both incorrect. I should be alphabetized as “Lu, S. Qiouyi.”

I prefer to have my entire name displayed as “S. Qiouyi Lu” instead of “S. Lu” or other variations. I always use a period after the first initial (S., not S).

My Chinese name is 陸秋逸, which I prefer to have typeset in traditional characters, but I will accept simplified (陆秋逸) if your style guide requires it. My name can be represented in Japanese as either 陸秋逸 or with katakana as S・チョウイー・ルウ. The IPA pronunciation for my name is /ɛs tɕʰjou̯˥ ji˥˩ lu˥˩/.

Pronouns and Terminology Conventions

My pronouns are æ/ær/ærs (fine to spell without ligatures, i.e., ae/aer/aers), he/him/his, e/em/eirs, and they/them/theirs, in order of preference. If using the ligature (æ/ær), the capital forms are Æ/Ær. If typesetting with the letters separated (ae/aer), the capital forms are Ae/Aer.

My non-English, language-specific pronoun preferences are:

  • español: elle (pronombre), -e o -x (adjetivos)
  • svenska: hen
  • 中文:TA、他,你 (禁止用妳)

For all other languages, my preferences are, in order:

  1. A language-specific gender-neutral neopronoun
  2. The most commonly used gender-neutral pronoun
  3. Masculine or gender-neutral pronouns and masculine adjective agreements
  4. Masculine or gender-neutral pronouns and feminine adjective agreements

If there are multiple options available, please feel free to contact me and let me know so I can select whichever set fits best.

You may use the titles M. (pronounced “em”), Mx. (pronounced “mix”), or Msc. (pronounced “misk”) to precede my name. Please do not use Ms., Miss, Mrs., or Mr., and avoid using “sir” or “ma’am” if possible. If you are required to use the terms, either is fine.

When describing me, use only the term “nonbinary” (not “enby”), as I do not use the term “trans” or “transgender” to describe myself. I prefer “nonbinary” without a hyphen, but will accept the hyphenated version if your style guide requires it.

I don’t mind being included in lists of trans or enby authors, though, with the understanding that I am being included under an umbrella term for visibility. However, I do not want to be included in lists of women, as I do not use the term to describe myself.

Bios

365 words

A satellite child of Chinese immigrants, S. Qiouyi Lu grew up traveling between Los Angeles and China, mainly Beijing and Anhui. As soon as æ could speak, S. was code-switching between Mandarin and English. Starting from middle school, S. began to learn Spanish as well. Having grown up among people of many ethnolinguistic backgrounds, especially people from all over Asia, S. learned from a young age how to identify Korean, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Hindi, and Japanese, among other languages.

After graduating high school, S. left ær Asian-American ethnoburb near Los Angeles to venture to the east coast for college. There, S. discovered that you don’t have to travel to a new country to be immersed in a new culture. Becoming an ethnic minority for the first time at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill piqued a deep curiosity about identity and power in S. While studying for a degree in linguistics, S. found ærself drawn to World Englishes, and, by extension, to the mechanisms of empires and colonization. In particular, the confluence of Western and Asian cultures in Singapore resonated with S. as a history that was both parallel to and wildly divergent from the history of Chinese-Americans. S. was twice awarded fellowships to study and conduct research in Singapore, where æ examined local attitudes toward the Speak Good English Movement. S. then went on to study Mandarin in Beijing for a semester before graduating.

S. spent a few years floundering in graduate school before realizing that æ didn’t want to be confined within the ivory tower after all. For a couple years after that, S. wrangled various desk jobs until æ finally punched capitalism in the face and decided to freelance. S. now writes, translates, and edits full-time. A multiply marginalized creator, S. draws from the unique intersections of ær experiences as a bisexual, nonbinary, disabled, second-generation Chinese-American humanist to create rich stories told for people on the margins outside the mainstream gaze. Æ also edits the magazines Arsenika and microverses, where æ prioritizes marginalized creators. You can find out more about S., including a complete list of publications and other work, at ær website s.qiouyi.lu. You can also follow S. on Twitter @sqiouyilu.

50 words

æ/ær

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. Ær work has appeared in several award-winning venues. Æ edits the magazine Arsenika and runs microverses, a hub for tiny narratives. You can find out more about S. at ær website s.qiouyi.lu or on Twitter @sqiouyilu.

he/him

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. His work has appeared in several award-winning venues. He edits the magazine Arsenika and runs microverses, a hub for tiny narratives. You can find out more about S. at his website s.qiouyi.lu or on Twitter @sqiouyilu.

e/em

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. Eir work has appeared in several award-winning venues. E edits the magazine Arsenika and runs microverses, a hub for tiny narratives. You can find out more about S. at eir website s.qiouyi.lu or on Twitter @sqiouyilu.

they/them

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. Their work has appeared in several award-winning venues. They edit the magazine Arsenika and run microverses, a hub for tiny narratives. You can find out more about S. at their website s.qiouyi.lu or on Twitter @sqiouyilu.

25 words

æ/ær

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. You can find out more about S. at ær website s.qiouyi.lu.

he/him

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. You can find out more about S. at his website s.qiouyi.lu.

e/em

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. You can find out more about S. at eir website s.qiouyi.lu.

they/them

S. Qiouyi Lu writes, translates, and edits between two coasts of the Pacific. You can find out more about S. at their website s.qiouyi.lu.

Headshots

Unless otherwise noted, all headshots are © S. Qiouyi Lu.